How Easy Is It To Take Your Dog To France?

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26 Responses

  1. Claude says:

    This sounds fantastic! Based on the photos here it seems Blue had as much fun in France as you did! I think it’s fab you took the effort to bring her along :-)

    • admin says:

      We all had a great time! To be fair, she did far less walking than at home; a stroll down the lane early in the morning was more than enough for her, she spent most of her time snoozing in the shade!

  2. This was so helpful. We have been trying to find out exactly what to do to take our dog with us to France on holiday for ages. Thank you

    • admin says:

      Our pleasure Barbara – it really is so much more simple than we imagined. Though the poor spaniel in the next car to ours did not cope with the rather bumpy ferry crossing quite so well as Blue, judging by the smell as they opened the boot to greet him when we were allowed back to the cars!
      I would suggest booking your French vet in advance – the power of Google Translate at your fingertips makes email simple if your Vet doesn’t happen to speak English!

  3. June says:

    thank you so much for your information it’s just what I was looking for . So pleased you had a lovely time with your children and ‘ fur baby ‘ !!

    • admin says:

      My pleasure – it felt like a huge undertaking when we did it, and I was a little frightened that there were a million legal hoops to jump through. But it turned into such a simple thing to do, it obviously needs talking about more!

  4. petercaulfield says:

    We’re hoping to take our dog with us to France we have nobody to leave her with and we love having her company anyway. She’s had her rabies jab and is chipped but we have been told by our vet that we have to worm her one month before we go then when we go and another month after we come back which doesn’t work if you’re only going for 2 weeks! Apparently this is all to prevent heartworm but we are going to the Dordogne which we understand isn’t a heartworm area. This sounds like an awful lot of worming I’d be interested to know if you had to do any of this. We are aware that they have very serious tick transmitted diseases over there so will administer advantix which we use here anyway because we live in the lakes which is dreadful for ticks. Thank you for posting the details of your holiday, we are also looking at homeaway, but there are loads of places that won’t take your dog.

  5. Evelyn Phillips says:

    Thank you for putting this easy guide on line. It is invaluable information which is just what we needed to keep our family together. The holiday wouldn’t be enjoyable at all without the dog.

  6. Rebecca says:

    Thanks for your helpful blog. Did you have any trouble with the fact that your dog is a Rotty?
    We want to travel accross France as well with ours and it seems that they are deemed dangerous dogs. They are called category 2 dogs and there is conflicting advice about what is required to bring them in to France.
    Thanks
    Rebecca

    • admin says:

      Hi Rebecca
      We’ve never been questioned about Blue’s breed – in fact we’ve never even had to use the muzzle we were told we had to use.
      Rottweilers are Cat 2 dogs in France, and are therefore allowed to be imported, but I think simply travelling is fine regardless of category. As long as they have a valid passport, you’re fine!

  7. Donna says:

    Your blog is an interesting read we’ve just started discussing after 4 years of coming to Duras (we have just arrived for our 4th yearly visit), bringing our 2 border collies next year. We miss them like crazing when there not around.. We’d love to come back to the gite were in, as its second year of coming here but they dont accept pets!! I realise you say they can’t do that now on France but we couldn’t just turn up with them!! I’d love to know were stayed? As were about to start looking for a pet friendly gite for next year ? Thanks for all the factual information it’s helped save me trawling xx

  8. Jaz says:

    Great thorough information, We are contemplating taking our black lab next year. Having read all the info on the defra website, I began to panic! Reading your advise and tips etc, makes it sound so much easier, plain and simple, Thank you.

  9. Linda says:

    Hi Donna I am taking my dog to France/spain/portugal she has a passport with rabies all being up to date. I am a bit confused with the DEFRA site as they only seem to mention whats required on way into UK – I have got all that but cant seem to find whats needed for entry into those countries. Even the vets not sure, she seems to think that my dog should have Tapeworm and flea/tick protection within 5 days of leaving UK and not before 24 hrs and this has to be stamped on the passport for entry into France. I cant find any reference to that. Can you help please as leaving soon.

  10. Katherine says:

    Really helpful- thank you so much. Do you know if it was possible to remain in your car with your dog on the ferry? Mine would much prefer this and I would be happy to sit in the car for the duration of the crossing.

  11. Christina says:

    Very helpful

  12. Ray says:

    Great article thanks. We are going to near Bordeaux this June and bringing our Golden Retriever with us. Really don’t to want to let her on ferry in car on own, so we are doing Folkestone to Calais on the shuttle where she stays in the car with us all.

  13. karon says:

    great blog, b ut i too have a beloved Rotti X spaniel and we are planning on taking him to France in two weeks , via P and O for ten days with my two boys. Im now very worried as it says on lots of sites that Rottis are dangerous dogs category 2 and tere are lots of conditions and should not risk taking them…?!
    Law of 6 January 1999 called “dangerous dogs”

    The law classifies potentially dangerous dogs into two categories:

    – 1st category which groups the attack dogs whose master can not trace the origin by a document, for example, Pitbulls, dogs assimilable to Mastiff dogs and dogs of Tosa-Inu appearance.

    – 2nd category which groups guard dogs or defense dogs registered in LOF (Book of French Origins), for example American Staffordshire Terrier. Their master has documents issued by the Société Centrale Canine (birth certificate and pedigree) attesting to the origin of the dog. The Rottweilers and dogs of Rottweiler appearance belong to this category even without registration to the LOF.

    Anyone elaborate on this please? we have no alternative but to take our dog if we want to go on holiday, but obviously would never put him at risk of being quarantined or worse for failing to jump through all the requested hoops etc. Thank you.

  14. Laura says:

    Hi Karon
    I did some research after your comment and it appears that you do indeed have extra restrictions on Rottweilers in France. If your dog doesn’t look very Rottweiler-ish, then I think you’ll be fine, but if he does then you’ll need to register him with the town council for where you’re staying, and have him muzzled and on a leash in public.
    I would contact the town council for where you are going to be staying, and ask how you go about getting him registered. I’m thinking that Blue may now be going to stay with friends for our France trip this summer!

  1. February 7, 2017

    […] of readers to her family travel blog.  “By a country mile my most popular post is – How easy is it to take your dog to France.  After receiving constant questions from friends – Oh, you took the dog with you! How […]

  2. May 9, 2017

    […] it recently came to our attention, thanks to a comment on my ‘how to take your dog to France‘ post that Rottweilers are actually classed as a Category 2 Dangerous Dog in France (a list […]

  3. May 15, 2017

    […] Don’t just take my word for it – Laura at Have Kids, Can Travel shares her experience here: How Easy Is It To Take Your Dog To France? […]

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